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Foundation Quiz 3

The reading for this quiz is Habits of a Happy Brain Chapters 7-9 and watch the video series, You Have Power Over Your Happy Brain Chemicals, and read its Action Guide.

When you pass this quiz, you get a free copy of I, Mammal and qualify for the Advanced Inner Mammal Training and for 3 CEUs. You are on your way to becoming a Certified Inner Mammal Trainer!

Foundation Quiz 3

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Question 1

Everyone experiences conflict because:

A
other people should meet your needs but they often fail
B
a step toward one happy chemical often risks another, or the perceived risk of pain
C
our society shames you for feeling good
D
immediate good feelings destroy long-term good feelings
Question 1 Explanation: 
It would be nice if there were risk-free ways to feel good, but good feelings evolved to motivate survival steps in a world of uncertainty.
Question 2

Free will:

A
does not exist because your neural pathways are shaped by experience.
B
means acting on your mammalian urges.
C
is the ability to resist an impulse and generate an alternative.
D
has been lost to more powerful forces.
Question 2 Explanation: 
In every moment you are choosing between acting on the first impulse that lights up, and inhibiting that impulse so your electricity can flow in another direction. That choice is limited but it’s the source of our power and our humanity, so we need to honor it rather than dismiss it.
Question 3

Every path to happy chemicals includes:

A
bad people you must avoid.
B
inner truth you must follow.
C
bad decisions you must undo.
D
trade-offs you must navigate.
Question 3 Explanation: 
Rewards do not come from simple choices between all-good and all-bad. The world presents us with complex trade-offs between rewards and pain, knowns and unknows, short-run and long-run. Fortunately, our brain evolved to weigh trade-offs, and a bigger brain can take more information into account.
Question 4

When you take a step that stimulates your dopamine,

A
you develop an addiction.
B
all your other happy chemicals move with it.
C
your serotonin and oxytocin fall in proportion.
D
you risk disappointment, which stimulates cortisol.
Question 4 Explanation: 
Disappointment is always a risk because you can’t be sure if a step will meet your need, and you can be sure that your dopamine will dip after it spurts. Disappointment stimulates cortisol because that’s the brain's signal to withdraw - to stop wasting energy on an effort that is not meeting a need.
Question 5

Why do people tend to repeat old behaviors instead of wiring in new ones?

A
Old survival learning helped you feel strong so departing from those lessons can feel weak.
B
Threatened feelings are released when you depart from old pathways and we interpret those feelings as a real threat.
C
You have to focus on your needs to build new pathways, and you may have learned not to focus on your own needs.
D
You can feel good about ignoring new choices by telling yourself it's “lowering your standards”
E
all of the above
Question 5 Explanation: 
The conscious reasons we give for repeating an old behavior are not the real reason; they're just the verbal brain’s effort to make sense of where the effortless flow of electricity leads you. We're better off learning to manage our electricity.
Question 6

When you blame your ups and downs on “our society,” you can expect all of the following EXCEPT:

A
your brain can easily find evidence to fit the expectation.
B
you can easily build trust with people who share that expectation.
C
you gain power over these ups and downs.
D
the happiness you are waiting for will never come because no society can reach into your brain and activate your neurons; and every society is made of mammals.
Question 6 Explanation: 
Frustrations are blamed on “our society” so routinely that it can be hard to notice the habit and alter it. And even if you succeed, you may find yourself out of step with the thinking of those around you. But changing this thought habit benefits you greatly because it's easier to relieve frustration when you know how you created it.
Question 7

If you expect some future accomplishment to make you happy forever:

A
the anticipated reward triggers some dopamine in the present if the reward seems to get closer.
B
you will be disappointed in the future because the brain habituates to new rewards.
C
you can disprove this belief by reading the tabloids, which are full of evidence that big accomplishments do not make you happy forever.
D
all of the above
Question 7 Explanation: 
Seems obvious, yet the alternatives are so widespread that it takes some focus to resist them.
Question 8

A good reason to mirror other people is:

A
to get them to take care of you.
B
to learn a healthy new behavior by observing someone who takes pleasure in it
C
to replace your thought process with someone else’s.
D
all of the above
Question 8 Explanation: 
You can learn a good habit by watching others as long as you maintain responsibility for meeting your own needs.
Question 9

If you find it easier to trigger one happy chemical, you can benefit by focusing on the others. Which of the following is NOT an example of this?

A
If you feel like a “dopamine person” who enjoys getting things done, you’d benefit most from new productivity strategies to get more done.
B
If you feel like an “oxytocin person” who easily enjoys social bonds, you’d get more from adding the dopamine of independent goal-seeking.
C
If you feel like a “serotonin person” who tends to enjoy a position of importance, you’d get more from adding the oxytocin of building trust.
D
If you feel like an “endorphin person,” good at mastering pain, you’d get more from adding the serotonin of seeking respect for your accomplishments.
Question 9 Explanation: 
A "dopamine person" would benefit most from new oxytocin or serotonin strategies. These personality types are not fixed; they're just another example of how we flow down old pathways until we courageously redirect the flow.
Question 10

Which of the following is a good tool for building new circuits?

A
Destroy an old circuit at its roots so you can graft a new one onto it.
B
Stay very busy so you have no energy to worry about your new challenge.
C
Replace your desire for big things with a desire for small things.
D
Reproduce as much as possible.
E
Divide a big challenge into small parts and enjoy accomplishing each one.
Question 10 Explanation: 
Your brain has many natural tools for successful circuit-building. It’s good to be familiar with them so a tool will always be handy when you need it.
Question 11

What can you do today to improve your future prospects for happiness?

A
Focus on your dreams and forget about everything else.
B
Focus on what goes wrong so you will never repeat the same mistake.
C
Sample new rewards so you will have alternatives when old rewards fade.
D
Buy chocolate in large boxes so it will always be available.
Question 11 Explanation: 
Re-read the book if you missed this one.
Question 12

 Frustration is natural because:

A
rewards are predictable.
B
you are consciously aware of your threat response.
C
it’s nature’s way of redirecting your energy away from an action that is not getting rewarded.
D
all of the above
Question 12 Explanation: 
Start over if you missed this one. Don’t pass GO.
Question 13

Accepting your inner mammal means:

A
accepting threats instead of resisting them.
B
following your impulses.
C
knowing that your good and bad feelings are information to help you navigate tough choices on the path to meeting your needs.
D
all of the above
Question 13 Explanation: 
Final warning that this method is not about following every happy impulse or ignoring every negative impulses. It's about weighing the impulse in new ways.
Question 14

Cortisol builds big neural pathways that wire you to feel threatened when:

A
you see an obstacle to meeting your needs.
B
your expectations are disappointed.
C
a new experience resembles something that hurt you before.
D
all of the above
Question 14 Explanation: 
Understanding cortisol is essential because once it's triggered you tend to feel like you're in a crisis.
Question 15

You can see a world of opportunity instead of a world of threat if you:

A
battle every threat you see, and win.
B
change the world to fit your vision of the way things should be.
C
focus on good things until you build a new place for your electricity to flow.
D
get lucky when opportunities come along.
Question 15 Explanation: 
Anyone can do it. You can start now.
Question 16

To manage frustration, be prepared with a plan based on:

A
sugar, alcohol, and anger.
B
love, forgiveness, and compassion.
C
energy, discipline, and attention to detail.
D
variety, focus, and realistic expectations.
Question 16 Explanation: 
Anger, love and energy come and go. You can’t force your emotions, but you can be ready with a plan that helps you make peace with your inner mammal when it feels threatened.
Question 17

Realistic expectations help you:

A
eliminate disappointment
B
reduce cortisol
C
let go of the future
D
activate your sense of urgency
Question 17 Explanation: 
Your mammal brain creates a sense of urgency about small things because it connects them to your genetic survival. You may be tempted to invoke the “greater good” to explain your sense of urgency, but you still end up with the cortisol. Realistic expectations help you avoid the unconscious comparisons that make things appear worse than they are.
Question 18

When you feel frustrated, a good strategy is to:

A
rely on the “happy habit” that always makes you feel good again.
B
have a variety of mood-lifting strategies so none is used to excess.
C
tell other people how they have let you down.
D
find evidence of all the ways you’ve been wronged.
Question 18 Explanation: 
Cortisol activates a search for evidence of threat, which keeps you focused on what's wrong with the world. You can avoid a vicious cycle if you're prepared with healthy happy-chemical habits.
Question 19

Your brain focuses on what you lack because it’s designed to keep striving to meet your needs. You can easily end up feeling deprived and frustrated with a brain like this. A good solution is to:

A
grieve with people who feel the same way.
B
party with people who feel the same way.
C
know that your feeling was triggered by electricity flowing down a well-developed pathway, and build a new pathway by focusing on what you have instead of what you lack.
D
get “help” and expect "them" to fix it for you.
Question 19 Explanation: 
The frustration circuit will keep growing bigger if you keep letting your attention go there. It’s hard to avoid this because so many of your fellow mammals are doing it. But you have the power to build a new circuit whenever you choose, just by focusing your attention in a new direction.
Question 20

Comparing yourself to others is:

A
a huge source of frustration.
B
a natural survival impulse for a mammal.
C
a habit that you can alter if you create an alternative and repeat it.
D
all of the above
Question 20 Explanation: 
It’s hard to create an alternative because the habit comes so naturally to us. Start by learning to notice every time you make mental comparisons. Then, practice finding one aspect of the situation that you can enjoy without comparing.
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